We have found this very easy to make Cowl Scarf using cosy Faux Fur.  Stylish warm accessories are an essential winter item, especially when they’re so easy & cheap to make!

 

What you will need

  1. A metre of Faux Fur Fabric that is at least 150cm wide (makes two cowls)
  2. Sewing machine
  3. Needle
  4. Thread
  5. Ruler, pen, scissors

 

make an easy diy faux cowl scarf

 

 

  1. Ensure your fabric is cut straight. If not, use a ruler, pen and scissors to measure and cut the faux fur so that it’s a nice, straight rectangle. When cutting faux fur, I always try to cut only the backing and not the fur (it can get really messy otherwise)! Cut the fabric in half width-wise so that you have two pieces that are approximately 30″ x 18″. Sew a rectangle right sides together along the long edge as shown.
  2. Pull the cowl right-side-out, and then fold the bottom up over the top as pictured. You can keep the seams on the same side as I did (this creates a taller, more upright cowl), or you can twist the inside piece so that the seam is on the opposite side like you’d do for an infinity scarf (this creates a cowl that lies flatter).
  3. Sew the short sides together as shown, leaving a 4″ hole.
  4. Turn the scarf right side out and hand stitch the hole shut.

 

Doesn’t this DIY faux fur cowl look so cosy?

I think it’d be so pretty (and practical) for a family outing at Christmas time!

 

Thank you to the Author, Christina from The DIY Mommy for sharing this fantastic easy-to-follow tutorial

 

  • BROWN FUR

    R150.00
  • GREY FUR

    R150.00
  • LEMUR FUR

    R129.00 Sale!
  • LEOPARD SPOT FUR

    R129.00 Sale!
  • RACOON STRIPE FUR

    R129.00 Sale!
  • SNOW LEOPARD FUR

    R129.00 Sale!
  • TIGER ORANGE SPOTS FUR

    R129.00 Sale!
Sew up the hole in the infinity scarf

This season’s trends are all about plush velvet, rich textures, and extra-cozy fabrics. If you hate being cold as much as I do, you’re probably obnoxiously excited about being warm and stylish too. Don’t worry. I won’t judge. But seriously, when you feel absolutely chilled to the bone, I can’t think of a better way to warm up than by bundling up in luxurious-feeling fabrics and accessories!

That’s why for today’s tutorial, we’ll be learning how to sew a loop scarf in under 20 minutes. Really. Since this project is so quick and easy to complete, it also makes for an easy handmade gift. Make one for you…and then one for a friend.

Before we get started learning how to sew a scarf, be sure to block out about 20 minutes of time and get your supplies together. This project goes quickly and is easy to make even if you are a beginning sewer. I’ve done the hard work for you and compiled a shoppable list for you to get everything you need without adding extra errands to your day.

Loop Scarf Supplies:

Supplies to make a velvet infinity scarf

1/2 Yard Velvet Fabric
Dressmaker Shears
Sewing Pins
Basic Sewing Machine

(Note: I’ll be using this serger for this tutorial but you can use a standard sewing machine with a zig-zag stitch as well.

How To Sew A Loop Scarf:

Now we get to actually put your project together and learn how to sew a scarf! Start by taking your fabric (1/2 yard) and folding it in half hot dog style with the plush (pretty) sides together. Pin your fabric into place along the long edge.

Cutting out the pattern for the inifinity scarf

Now, sew the entire length of the velvet to create a long tube. I used a serger, but you can also use a standard straight stitch on a basic sewing machine.

Flip it inside out and fold it in half again. You should be left with something that looks like this:

Flip scarf pieces over to sew the seams of the infinity scarf

Believe it or not, you are almost done. Now we just need to attach the two ends together to create a full circle, thus making it an “infinity” scarf. To do this, pin the two ends together making sure to have the pretty side of the fabric facing the other pretty side.

Attaching the pieces together with pins for the infinity scarf

Head back over to your sewing machine and begin. When you get close to making a full circle, stop and detach from the machine. You will finish the tiny hole on one side by hand.

Sewing your infinity scarf together and leave a hole

Your scarf should look nearly complete but have one small hole in the base like pictured. Use a hand-sewing needle to close up the hole and you are done.

Easy enough right?

Sew up the hole in the infinity scarf

I love the versatile look of this scarf. It’s casual enough to wear with a basic t-shirt yet can also be dressed up a bit since it’s made of more elegant-looking fabric. It is soooo good at keeping your neck warm on frosty nights yet still feels surprisingly lightweight. You can wear this scarf either by looping it around your neck once for a longer, draped look or twice for a thicker, warmer scarf.

I hope you guys found this tutorial on how to sew a scarf useful and easy to follow.

Thank you to The Creative Fashion Blog for this tutorial

PLAIN FLEECE FABRIC TUTORIAL

Sewing fleece is a piece of relatively new fabric on the market. Originally known as Polar Fleece it is soft and warm. Fluffy on both sides, it is basically a wash and wear fabric. Polar fleece is not woven and is 100% polyester. It comes in a wide range of colors and designs. Popular for tracksuits and leisurewear for all ages it is relatively easy to sew.

WHAT IS FLEECE FABRIC?

Fleece fabric is a 100% polyester fabric with a fluffy nap. It is used for warm clothing and is a cheaper alternative to natural wool. Because it does not fray and has minimal stretch, it is easy to sew. While fleece is thick it is lighter than wool and thus is comfortable to wear.

Main Types of Fleece Fabric

Polar Fleece – this is one of the most common types of fleece that you will find. It is fluffy on both sides and can be medium to heavyweight. Polar fleece is great for no-sew projects and for when you want something quick and easy to make with edges that will not fray.

PLAIN FLEECE FABRIC TUTORIAL

Sweatshirt Fleece – I like using this type of fleece for dresses, hoodies and pants. On the outside, it looks knitted and on the inside it is fluffy. Sweatshirt fleece can also be labeled brushed fleece or cotton fleece. Buy better quality sweatshirt fleece so the outside doesn’t pill after a few washes.

 

SWEATSHIRT FLEECE

Micro Fleece – This is a lightweight fleece mainly used for baby clothing. It is a little thinner and stretchier to sew and can overstretch if you are not careful.

SEWING FLEECE

Here are some basic tips to consider when sewing with fleece.

Tip #1 – Preparation

PREWASH – Before cutting out your sewing project, prewash your fleece fabric to test for shrinkage and colorfastness.

PATTERN CHOICE – Not all patterns are suited to fleece. Check your pattern says – ‘suitable for stretch fabrics’ this will enable you to cut and sew fleece with the pattern you choose. Also, determine the stretch factor (article includes a printable sheet) to match the pattern type to your fleece. You generally need at least 20-50% stretch. Some cheaper fleece types have next to no stretch and are not suitable for stretch patterns.

All of these samples were sewn from Treasurie patterns using fleece. You can tell that I like red, can’t you? I tend to prefer sweatshirt fleece which generally doesn’t come in quite as many colors and patterns as Polar fleece.

SEWING FLEECE

Tip #2 – Cutting

GRAINLINES – Fleece fabric is not woven so a grain of the fabric is not clearly visible. The grain is defined by the nap or the way the brushed texture of the fabric moves.

WRONG SIDE VS RIGHT SIDE – The best way to define the right or wrong side is to cut a sample of the fabric and then cut the sample on the cross. The fabric will naturally curl towards the wrong side. Fleece is usually fluffier on the wrong side.

SCISSORS – Use sharp scissors so the edges don’t burr and for very thick fleece, you may need to cut in single layers instead of double. Don’t forget that some pieces may need to be mirrored so flip your pattern piece when cutting the second shape if necessary.

PINS – If you find that your pins are slipping out of the fabric, use safety pins instead. Quilting pins which are longer can also be used.

MARKING – Traditional marking methods using chalk don’t always work on fleece due to the pile on the fabric. Try using a running stitch or Tailor’s tacks to mark darts and markings.

 

TAILOR TACKS

TIP #3 – Tools

THREAD – Sew with a good quality polyester thread. Like most sewing projects, a matching thread will be more forgiving of any crooked seams.

NEEDLES – Use good quality sewing needles and change them often. Microtex or ballpoint needles are best. Do a test seam and if you get any skipped stitches, try a stretch needle designed for sewing knit fabrics.

SEWING MACHINE FOOT – Most of the time an all-purpose foot can be used but for really thick fleece, try a walking foot or a Teflon foot. These specialty feet will prevent the thicker fleece from bunching up and wrinkling.

TIP #4 -Stitching

PREPARATION – Stay stitching on curved areas such as necklines is important because this fabric is very stretchy.

STITCHES – Use a small zig zag stitch to help with the stretch of the fabric. This will prevent stitches from popping in areas with extra movement where some elasticity is needed. Try a stitch of width 1.0 and length 3.0 and adjust as needed. Test a scrap. The stitches should not break when you stretch the seam.

 

 

SERGER – A serger is ideal for sewing fleece as the seam will have a built in elasticity. (How to use a serger)

SEWING WITH A SERGER

FLAT SEAMS – If your fleece is too bulky to sew a regular seam, then consider a lapped or flat fell seam.

TENSION – Loosen the sewing machine tension with a larger, longer stitch to give a bit more stretch.

BE GENTLE – Ease the fabric through the machine, don’t pull and cause tension issues.

HEMS – Finish off hems and sleeve edges with rib trim. Alternatively, turn up the hem and use a wide zig-zag to stitch over the edge. Test a width of 4.0 and a length of 3.0.

HANDSTITCHING – If you don’t have a sewing machine, you could use a backstitch for the seams and blanket stitch for the hems. Blanket stitch in particular results in a very attractive edge and can be used in conjunction with machine seams. If you are an absolute beginner, consider doing a simple up and down stitch called a running stitch.

PRESSING – Press the fabric with caution, fleece does not enjoy a hot iron and may melt. If you do need to press, use a cotton pressing cloth in between the iron and your fleece.

TIP #5 -Seam Finishes

Fleece does not fray and therefore seam finishes are not really necessary but can still look nice.

 

Seam finishing options include –

  • Zig zag the raw edges
  • Use a serger (overlocker) to neaten seam
  • Trim the seams neatly with sharp straight scissors. You could also use pinking shears but they can be harder to use unless they are really new and sharp.

BULKY SEAMS – Try to reduce bulk in seams and on the attachment of collars or cuffs. Line the underside of a collar with a cotton fabric to lessen the bulk of a collar for example. Thick seams can be cut in layers which is called seam grading.

 

BULKY SEAMS

TIP #6 – Cleaning

Fleece may tend to fluff up your machine and caution needs to be taken to keep your machine clean during the time you sew with fleece. Keep an eye on the bobbin case as this is a major collector of lint! Read cleaning a sewing machine .

If you use a serger, keep the blade of the machine clean and remove fluff from the underneath of the machine.

SEWING FLEECE – IN CONCLUSION

Generally speaking, sewing fleece is very rewarding as it is an easy to sew fabric that needs the minimum finishing off and neatening. Fleece is comfortable to wear and warm during the winter chills and making leisurewear is made easy with the use of fleece for all kinds of projects.

 

Thank you to Treasurie for writing this informative article

If you would like to visit their site please CLICK HERE.  

SHOP FOR FLEECE

  • AIRCRAFTS PRINTED FLEECE

    AIRCRAFTS PRINTED FLEECE

    R45.00
  • ARMY CAMO PRINTED FLEECE

    ARMY CAMO PRINTED FLEECE

    R45.00
  • BASIC CHECK PRINTED FLEECE

    BASIC CHECK PRINTED FLEECE

    R45.00
  • BBF PRINTED FLEECE

    BBF’S & HEART FLEECE

    R45.00
  • BEIGE PLAIN FLEECE

    BEIGE PLAIN FLEECE

    R40.00
  • BELOVED HEARTS PRINTED FLEECE

    BELOVED HEARTS PRINTED FLEECE

    R45.00
  • BIG PAWS PRINTED FLEECE

    BIG PAWS PRINTED FLEECE

    R45.00
  • BLACK – PLAIN FLEECE FABRIC

    R40.00
  • BLACK AND PINK CHECK PRINTED FLEECE

    BLACK AND PINK CHECK PRINTED FLEECE

    R45.00
  • BLACK AND RED CHECK PRINTED FLEECE

    BLACK AND RED CHECK PRINTED FLEECE

    R45.00
  • BLUE AND RED CHECK PRINTED FLEECE

    R45.00
  • BLUE ARMY PRINTED FLEECE

    BLUE ARMY PRINTED FLEECE

    R45.00
  • BLUE CAMO DINOSAUR PRINTED FLEECE

    BLUE CAMO DINOSAUR PRINTED FLEECE

    R45.00
  • BLUE SHADES CHECK PRINTED FLEECE

    BLUE SHADES CHECK PRINTED FLEECE

    R45.00
  • BROWN – PLAIN FLEECE

    R40.00
Candlewicking Tutorial

Candlewicking, a classic whitework embroidery technique, has a distinct style that involves stitching primarily with Colonial knot stitches. In the early days of the United States, especially during the Westward Expansion, fine embroidery threads weren’t plentiful—they also wouldn’t have been especially practical. However, because the cotton threads used for making candle wicks were easy to acquire, they may have become the material of choice for those who wished to add some embellishment to quilts and other sewing projects.

This embroidery style uses Colonial knots, which are tighter and sturdier than their cousin, the French knot, which makes sense for use on items like quilts, which can see a lot of wear. Colonial knots also use far less thread than French knots. If supplies are scarce, that’s a big selling point!

Candlewick embroidery is considered a whitework technique, so typically it’s stitched with white or natural thread on white or natural fabric. However, it doesn’t have to be—feel free to use color in your candlewicking, either by matching your thread and fabric with a bold color or by working with a whole rainbow.

 

What You’ll Need

Embroidery Essentials can be purchased ONLINE (Products included at the end of this tutorial)  or INSTORE (Fish Hoek / Tokai

Downloadable Pattern is FREE – located at the end of this tutorial

Hoop
Embroidery needle
Embroidery scissors
Pattern transfer tools
Materials
Embroidery floss
Unbleached muslin or linen fabric

Step 1: Make a Colonial Knot

Start by coming up through the fabric and then making a backward “C” around the needle with the working thread.

Make a Colonial Knot in Candlewicking

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 2: Bring the Work Thread Over and Under

Next, bring the working thread over and under the tip of the needle. The thread should look a bit like a figure eight.

Bring the Work Thread Over and Under in Candlewicking

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Insert the Needle

Insert the needle in the fabric, close to where the stitch started. You can go back in the same hole, this can cause the knot to pop through to the back in looser-weave fabrics. Pull the working thread to tighten the knot around the needle.

Insert the Needle in Candlewicking

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Form the Knot

While holding the working thread taut, bring the needle and thread all the way through the fabric to form the knot. Work each Colonial knot the same way, keeping them tight and consistent.

Form the Knot in Candlewicking

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Candlewick Embroidery Patterns

There are plenty of candlewick patterns to choose from, including some free designs or vintage transfers. Many have a traditional style and often combine Colonial knots with back stitch and some satin stitch. You can also use simple designs for standard embroidery and stitch the lines with a row of knots instead of an outlining stitch.

To get started, download this free candlewick embroidery pattern. A cross between a flower and a mandala, it’s easy and relaxing to stitch. Print the pattern so that the design measures about 5 inches across. Use your favorite transfer method to mark the design on your fabric and place the fabric in a hoop. Work with pieces of thread that are about as long as from your elbow to the tips of your fingers to prevent tangling.

Start with a waste knot and weave the ends later, or just knot the end of the thread and start stitching. All that’s left to do is simply stitch a Colonial knot on every dot in the pattern.

 

A BIG THANK YOU GOES OUT TO THE AUTHOR MOLLIE JOHANSEN


Free Printable Pattern

  • candlewicking mandala pattern

    CANDLEWICKING MANDALA – BEGINNERS

    R0.00

Buy Supplies Here

Completed-Macrame-Hanging-Pot

Hey guys! Today I’m gonna be showing you how to make a macrame plant hanger.

I love macrame and I wanted to be making this plant hanger for a while now. I love the vibe they bring to a space and how cute they look with a plant in them!

It is a very easy project and the end result will reward you for your effort! So, let’s show you how to make this macrame plant hanger!

 

make a macrame pot hanger

Grab a wooden or a metal ring and pass through eight macrame strands, 4 yards each, until you reach the center of the strands.

Then, you have to make a gathering knot to join all of the cords.

To be doing this all you have to do is to take a piece of string that’s about 2 feet long and place the one end below the wooden ring, hold it there with your thumb and create a loop a couple of inches down and then take the longer side of the string and wrap it around all of the cords tightly.

When you’re done with the wrapping, pass the string you were working with through the loop and then take the other end and pull it up, so that it drags the loop and hides it under the coil.

Step 6 - Cutting the Knot

To finish the gathering knot all you have to do is to cut off the ends of the cord you were working with and you’re done with this knot!

Next, you’re gonna need to separate out four sections of four strands each that are close to each other. Then you’re gonna need to take one section and start making square knots.

Square Knots

Step 8 - Square Knots
Step 8 – Square Knots

All you have to do is to take the left side cord and bring it up on top of the two middle ones and under the right cord, creating the number 4.

Then pass the right cord behind the two middle cords and then through the loop and then pull this tight to the top to meet the gathering knot. Now you have created the half square knot so let’s go and do the other half!

Step 11 – Macrame

To be doing this all you have to do is to take the right cord this time, bring it up on top of the two middle ones, and under the left cord, creating a reverse number 4.

Then pass the left cord behind the two middle cords and then through the loop. After that, pull it tight to meet the other knot…and now you have created a completed square knot!

Step 14 - Macrame
Step 14 – Macrame

Next, go ahead and make fifteen square knots to the section you were working with and then apply this pattern to the other three sections.

Next, you’re gonna need to take to sections that are close to each other and separate two strings from each section that are next to each other and you’re gonna make half square knots.

To be doing this you’re gonna have to repeat the number 4 or the reversed number 4 for the knotting.

Twisting half square knots

I chose to take the left string, put it on top of the middle ones, and under the right string, creating the number 4 and then passed the right string behind the two middle ones and then through the loop.

Then I pulled it up about 3 inches down from the flat square knots.

Step 18 - Twisting Knots Macrame
Step 18 – Twisting Knots Macrame

And I repeated this pattern until I made 30 knots. As you can see, this knotting creates a spiral form to the strings.

Then I took the next four strings that were next to each other and continued my twisting half square knots until I ended up with four spiral sections.

Netting

After that, you need to connect the spirals together and all you have to do is to pick two of them that are next to each other and take the two cords of each spiral that are close to each other and create two square knots about 2 1/2 inch down from the spirals.

You then have to repeat this knotting for all the remaining strings.

Tip

You have to be aware guys to adjust the height of the square knots exactly at the same point you did with the first one.

Step 21 - Netting Macrame
Step 21 – Macrame

When you complete the first row, move on to the second one. Pick two square knots that are next to each other and take two strands from each square knot that are close to each other and make another two square knots.

Step 22 - Macrame
Step 22

Then finish another row of knots that are 2 1/2 inch down from the previous row. And keep going until you complete three rows.

Final Gathering Knot

Step 3 - Final Knot Macrame
Step 3 – Final Knot Macrame

When you’re done with the knotting you’re gonna need to make the final gathering knot about 1 1/2-2 inch down from the last row of your square knots.

Gather all of your cords together and place the one end of a 2 feet string on top of the cords and create a loop and then wrap the string around the cords tightly and pass the end of the string you were working with through the loop and then pull the other end up to catch and hide the loop under the coil.

Then trim off the two ends with a pair of scissors and in the end trim your fringe. I cut mine at 6 inches down from the gathering knot and now it’s ready to be hung!

We hope that you enjoyed this tutorial.

Show us your Hanging Macrame Holder by sending a pic to @global_unique_fabrics

A special thank you goes to Love 4 DIY for sharing this fantastic tutorial

Buy Your Macrame Yarn

 

 

My pillow is good size and measures 17 x 17 inches square.

If you are starting from scratch just cut your fabric a 1/2 inch bigger on all sides and this will give you a 1/2 inch seam allowance. Sew the heart onto the pillow before you sew the pillow sections together. Since my pillow was already made I just stitched mine right onto the pillow.

I folded a piece of 12 x 12 paper in half and drew a half heart onto it and then cut that out. Opened it up and that was my pattern. My heart is 11 1/2 inches tall and 11 1/2 inches wide

I made marks all the way around the edge of the heart pattern so I would know where to stitch. My stitches are 3/4 inch long and there is about 3/8 in between each stitch. Of course it is handmade so it is not perfect or exact!

 

 

When you place the pattern onto the fabric DO NOT center it. Push the heart up an inch or two so that you have more space at the bottom.

 

This way you don’t lose the bottom of the heart when the pillow is sitting upright.

I used 1 inch wide red satin ribbon. You will also need a needle with a really big eye so that you can thread the ribbon through the needle.

Start at the bottom of the heart and leave your self a nice long tail. The amount of ribbon you need will vary depending on the size you make your pillow and heart.

Since my pillow was already made up I had to just slip my needle under the fabric and try not to pull up the fiberfill that was inside the pillow.

Just sew all the way around the pattern and then tie a bow at the bottom and you’re done!! You can then sew your pillow front to the back leaving an opening on the bottom to insert your pillow form or your fiberfill stuffing and then stitch up the opening.

So cute!!

Visit our Sewing & Dress Fabric Studio to shop for your favourite fabrics & sewing essentials & start crafting.

Hashtag a pic of your completed project to #global_unique_fabrics

 

Yarn-wrapped cardboard hearts are so simple to make and can be used for all kinds of Valentine’s Day crafts. Add them to clear jars for a pretty centerpiece idea!

 

You probably already have all of the items needed to make these cute hearts! Just cardboard, yarn and a hot glue gun and you can make these festive yarn-wrapped hearts!  The best part of this easy craft is it’s so fast! In 30 minutes you can have several heart-wrap cardboard hearts to use and your kids will love making them too. I used a glue gun to keep the yarn on the curved edges of the hearts but you can use a glue stick too if your kids want to make some!

 

YARN-WRAP CARDBOARD HEARTS CAN BE USED FOR VALENTINE’S DAY PROJECTS

Once you have a few hearts made, either use them by themselves on a table like I did. Or you can glue them onto ribbon to create a Valentine’s Garland. Sprinkle them throughout your home on shelves or add them to a wreath!

 

HOW TO MAKE A YARN-WRAP HEART VALENTINE’S DAY CENTERPIECE

 

 

I used the yarn-wrapped cardboard hearts to create a sweet little Valentine’s Day centerpiece on our dining room table. This is how I created this easy centerpiece idea:

  • I added some pretty yarn to the bottom of the jars.
  • Then I added fairy lights.
  • I put a heart from my Pebbles Avenues Line on little houses and put a house in each jar.
  • Then I added a couple of the yarn-wrapped hearts to each jar.
  • The last thing I did was tie some red and white ribbon on each jar and put them on cake stands in the middle of our table.
  • I sprinkled more of the yarn-wrapped hearts around the jars on the table!

 

 

Add a dab of glue to the center of each heart and start wrapping the heart by wrapping the yarn tightly and closely together in one direction.

 

Making the heart templates

 

TURN HEART AND START WRAPPING IN DIFFERENT DIRECTION

Once one section is covered, turn the heart and put a dab of glue at both ends of the heart and start wrapping in that direction. The hot glue (or glue from glue stick) will hold the yarn in that new direction. Keep turning the heart and adding glue as you turn until the heart is covered with yarn.

 

ADD MORE YARN TO SPARSE SECTIONS

After the heart is covered, see if there are sections that need a little more yarn so that none of the cardboard is showing through. Add more yarn to places that need more coverage.

 

 

ADD GLUE AND CUT YARN

 

Once the heart is covered, add a dab of glue under the yarn strand and cut it right next to the glue you added to neatly finish off each yarn-wrapped heart.

 

 

And that’s how easy these are to make. 

Be sure to add them to your LOVE Decor & send us a pic if you dare!

#global_unique_fabrics

 

 

 

valentines day giveaway

She wears the pants! The rust, wide leg pants that is.

For years I’ve reached for a wide leg trouser when I’ve wanted to feel confident and elegant, and have always found them particularly useful for adding a sense of a style to a more streamlined/revealing top. Not being able to wear them during pregnancy has given me even more of a hankering for them. This time around? We’re all about a rust linen style of an oh so comfy shirred waistband. Read on for how to make them yourself.

 

supplies needed to make wide leg pattern

WHAT YOU NEED

TWO METRES FABRIC – We recommend using Cotton – see our Cotton Collections in the products below.
FABRIC MARKER
FABRIC CHALK
FABRIC SCISSORS
COLOR THREAD
ELASTIC THREAD
FUSING TAPE
SEWING MACHINE
PATTERN MAKING RULER
PINS

 

 

Supplies available to order directly below the tutorial without having to leave this page until you’re ready to place your order.  The instructions to make these fabulous pants are below the products.  We’d love to see what you’ve made so HASHTAG a picture to #global_unique_fabrics.

Part 1

Lay your pants or paper pattern onto your fabric, trace around, then leave seam allowance and cut.

PART 1 -Wide Leg Pants Pattern

Part 2

You should end up with two front and back panels for the pants. As for the waistband, the length can be done as long as you’d like, ours was 4”. Since this piece will be shirred, it’s width needs to be at least 1.3 times your waist measurement.

PART 3 -Wide Leg Pants Pattern

 

Part 3

Sew the pant legs first by pinning the front and back panels of each side together, then sew down the side seams.

PART 2 -Wide Leg Pants Pattern

Part 4

Turn one of the pant legs right-side-out and insert it into the other unturned pant leg.

Line up the crotch seam, then pin and sew.

Part 5

Shirr your waistband. Mark guidelines for sewing the straight lines if necessary.

PART 3 -Wide Leg Pants Pattern

Part 6

Pin the right sides of the shirred waistband to the pant legs, then sew. The waistband will be facing down during this process, but we will flip it back right way up after sewing.

 

PART 6 -Wide Leg Pants Pattern

Part 7

Flip the waistband back up and iron the fold flat. Finish the top of the waistband by folding the seam allowance in and sewing it shut.

 

PART 7 -Wide Leg Pants Pattern

Part 8

Something to be aware of, you will have to pull and stretch the shirred waistband whenever you sew it, if not, the waistband will not stretch if you just sew over the shirring.

 

PART 8 -Wide Leg Pants Pattern

 

VIDEO TUTORIAL OF THE SHIRRING PROCESS

BUY YOUR SUPPLIES ONLINE OR VISIT INSTORE

 

  • 0109 SERAFIL THREAD

    R50.00
  • 0118 SERAFIL THREAD

    R50.00
  • 0323 SERAFIL THREAD

    R50.00
  • 0757 SERAFIL THREAD

    R50.00
  • 0818 SERAFIL THREAD

    R50.00
  • 1000 SERAFIL THREAD

    R50.00
  • 1222 SERAFIL THREAD

    R50.00
  • 1225 GUTERMANN QUILTING

    R38.50
  • 1316 SERAFIL THREAD

    R50.00

  • Embroidery Scissors with Large Handles

    EMBROIDERY SCISSORS

    R25.00
  • LARGE TAYLOR SCISSORS

    R280.00
  • Rotary Cutter 45mm
  • scissors for sewing

    SEWING SCISSORS M1000

    R159.00
  • SOFT GRIP SCISSORS / 1X30

    R35.00

  • TWILL TAPE – 19MM

    R4.00
  • TWILL TAPE – 25MM

    R5.00

Supplies Needed:

This pattern is best for little kids around 3-6 years old and may be too small for bigger kids. You can alter the apron pattern to make it larger: To make it wider cut it vertically down the center and add a few inches.

To make it longer: cut it horizontally, above the bottom curved edges, and add a few inches. I’m working on adding a bigger kid pattern early 2021. 

Step One: Use the free printable pattern and cut out the fabric.

Grab the free printable pattern at the end of this post and cut two apron pieces. The apron is reversible so choose two fun, coordinating fabrics.

Step Two: Quilt the two layers of fabric.

I quilted the two layers of fabric together with vertical lines spaced 1″ apart. The quilting will help keep the apron looking nice after being washed. I lightly drew stitching lines with pencil on the back side of the apron. I used a thread color that would blend in and started with the center line and worked my way out smoothing the fabric as I went. Press apron.

Step Three: Add the bias binding.

After the apron is quilted, the last step is adding the bias binding. I started with the lower half of the apron and the top edge. I sandwiched the two layers of the apron in-between the bias tape and pinned it in place. You can use your iron to help shape the bias tape into a curve when rounding the bottom corners of the apron. Stitch with matching thread.

The next piece of bias tape I attached was 85″ long. Pin the bias tape, as shown in the picture below, so 19″ is left for the neck hole. It helped to find the halfway point of my 85″ long piece and then start pinning the bias tape to the top of the apron 9.5″ from that halfway point.

The apron is finished! I love how they turned out and how cute the aprons look from either side! If the neck opening is too long for your child, you can tie it in a knot to make it smaller.

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download [145.36 KB]

how to make a pencil case

Step 1: What You’ll Need

What You'll Need

WE HAVE AN AMAZING ON-TREND RANGE OF IRON ON MOTIFS

TO ADD EXTRA PERSONALITY TO YOUR CASES *

 

Since this is the most basic of zippered pencil cases, we’re going to be relying entirely on the stiffness of the exterior fabric to make it hold its shape – no interfacing is used!

I used a quilting weight cotton for the lining and a slightly thicker and stiffer cotton for the exterior. :)

 

Step 2: Lay Out Your Pieces

Lay Out Your Pieces
Lay Out Your Pieces
Lay Out Your Pieces

Zip the zipper up all the way before you start.

Lay your lining fabric down on the table right side up (really only matters if it’s printed, otherwise whatever side you want up is right. :D) and lay the zipper down on top with the pull as shown. Line the zipper and fabric up at their right edges.

Optional: To make it easier to sew, tack together the top of the zipper using some needle and thread. It can be tricky to sew this all together if those ends are flapping about and separating. (See photo 3)

Lay the exterior fabric wrong side up on top of the zipper and lining. Line up all the edges and pin in place.

 

Step 3: Sewing

Sewing
Sewing
Sewing

Use a regular foot for this!

Place the pinned fabrics under the presser foot and line it up so the left edge of the foot is right up against the zipper. (This will leave you with a pretty teeny seam allowance, a little over 1/8 inch – that’s okay!) Backstitch at the edge of the fabric and then stitch down the edge until you get a few inches from the other end and backstitch again.

Now you’ll want to pull the work out of the machine – unpin the bottom and lift the exterior fabric. (See photo 2) Now, upzip the zipper and pull it so that it goes up and into the already sewn area of the pouch.

Repin and line up the right edges again. (See photo 3)

Continue sewing where you left off – just put the needle right down in your backstitching. Backstitch at both ends again on the second half of the stitching. :D

Step 4: Sew the Other Side of the Pouch

Sew the Other Side of the Pouch

Repeat what you just did using the other side of the zipper. :D

Just line everything up on the right edge and pin and sew.

Step 5: What It Should Look Like Now

What It Should Look Like Now
What It Should Look Like Now

Both exterior and lining should be sewn to the zipper and nicely lined up. :)

If the ouside edges are a little wonky, feel free to straighten them up using the ruler and some scissors.

Step 6: Sew the Bottom of the Pouch Together

Sew the Bottom of the Pouch Together
Sew the Bottom of the Pouch Together

Pin the edges opposite the zipper together with the lining on the outside.

Sew down this edge using a 1/4 inch seam allowance, backstitching at both ends.

You can trim the excess seam allowance with pinking shears if you have them – they’ll stop it from fraying and make it look a little nicer.

Step 7: Sew the Ends

Sew the Ends
Sew the Ends
Sew the Ends
Sew the Ends

Flatten the pouch out so the zipper is sitting directly above the bottom seam.

Unzip is about half way.

Sew across both ends using a 1/4 inch seam allowance, backstitching at both edges. Yes, you’re going to sew over the zipper and everything! Just take it slow over the zipper and you’ll be fine.

When sewing across the edge with the open zipper, make sure both sides of the zipper fabric are touching as you sew over it. Otherwise, you’ll sew it in a way so there’s a big gaping hole. :(

Once both ends are sewn, trim the zipper so it lines up with the fabric. You can also trim the seam allowances with pinking shears. :)

Once all the trimming and sewing is done, turn it right side out!

Step 8: And You Have a Pouch!

And You Have a Pouch!

If this looks fancy enough to you, call it a day.

But if you’re wanting to make it boxy, have a look at the next step. :D

Step 9: Making the Corners Boxy

Making the Corners Boxy
Making the Corners Boxy
Making the Corners Boxy

The pictures will probably explain this better than I can. :D

Take one end of the pouch and flatten it out. Line up the zipper and bottom seam. Now you’ll want to take off the corners. Taking off more of the corner will result in a tinier, boxier pouch.

As you can see, my vertical line was about 2 1/2 inches long – I would recommend keeping it a 1 1/2 inches or smaller – otherwise you might have issues with getting full size pencils in.

You can pin the seams and try it out before you mark and sew too!

Once you’re happy, mark and sew along the seams.

Repeat for the other end of the bag. :)

 

Step 10: Trim It Up and Turn It Right Side Out

Trim It Up and Turn It Right Side Out
Trim It Up and Turn It Right Side Out
Trim It Up and Turn It Right Side Out

Once it’s all sewn, turn it right side out and double check everything. If it’s wonky, rip out the stitching and try again. If you’re happy with it, trim off all the corners.

BOOM! You just made a super cute pencil case. :D

EMAIL REQUEST TO VIEW RANGE OF MOTIFS TO: 
info@globalfabrics.co.za